Tag: book review

Letters to a Young Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens: Book Review

In Letters to a Young Contrarian, bestselling author and world-class provocateur Christopher Hitchens inspires the radicals, gadflies, mavericks, rebels, and angry young (wo)men of tomorrow. Exploring the entire range of “contrary positions”–from noble dissident to gratuitous nag–Hitchens introduces the next generation to the minds and the misfits who influenced him, invoking such mentors as Emile Zola,

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Mortality by Christopher Hitchens: Book Review

Throughout the course of his ordeal battling esophageal cancer, Hitchens adamantly and bravely refused the solace of religion, preferring to confront death with both eyes open. In this account of his affliction, he describes the torments of illness, discusses its taboos, and explores how disease transforms experience and changes our relationship to the world around

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No One Left to Lie to: The Values of the Worst Family by Christopher Hitchens: Book Review

In No One Left to Lie To, Christopher Hitchens portrays President Bill Clinton as one of the most ideologically skewed and morally negligent politicians of recent times. In a blistering polemic which shows that Clinton was at once philanderer and philistine, crooked and corrupt, Hitchens challenges perceptions – of liberals and conservatives alike – of this

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Dishonesty is the Second-Best Policy: And Other Rules to Live By by David Mitchell: Book Review

We’ve gone from UKIP surge to Brexit shambles, from horsemeat in lasagne to Donald Trump in the White House, from Woolworths going under to all the other shops going under. It’s probably socially irresponsible even to attempt to cheer up. But if you’re determined to give it a go, you might enjoy this eclectic collection

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The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice by Christopher Hitchens: Book Review

“It is past time that she [Mother Teresa] was subjected to the rational critique that she has evaded so arrogantly and for so long.” This final statement made in the Afterword of this sharp whip-crack of a book is the reason for both its existence, and the reading of its content. So often, whether we

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The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam by Douglas Murray: Book Review

I suggest that anyone who finds themselves in the position of having an opinion, or several opinions, on the issue of immigration, but is struggling to convince others, or even themselves, that their conclusions are based in an infallible understanding of the situation, this book is the perfect place to start

Why I've Stopped Reading The Wheel of Time (for now)

Robert Jordan‘s Wheel of Time series has been a part of my reading life for almost three years now. I’ve stopped reading at 37% into The Fires of Heaven (#5) and I can’t bring myself to keep reading right now. I thought I would write a post to explain how I am feeling about this

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Why You Should Read Mistborn Era 2, The Alloy Era

I recently finished reading The Bands of Mourning which is the third book in Mistborn Era 2. This is something I was not sure I would do when I finished The Alloy of Law (Alloy Era #1). The first book in this series bored me. I was high on the incredible ending of the Mistborn

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The Bands of Mourning (Mistborn: The Alloy Era #3) by Brandon Sanderson: Book Review

The Bands of Mourning are the mythical metal minds owned by the Lord Ruler, said to grant anyone who wears them the powers that the Lord Ruler had at his command. Hardly anyone thinks they really exist. A kandra researcher has returned to Elendel with images that seem to depict the Bands, as well as

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Shadows of Self (Mistborn: The Alloy Era #2) by Brandon Sanderson: Book Review

Shadows of Self shows Mistborn’s society evolving as technology and magic mix, the economy grows, democracy contends with corruption, and religion becomes a growing cultural force, with four faiths competing for converts. This bustling, optimistic, but still shaky society now faces its first instance of terrorism, crimes intended to stir up labor strife and religious conflict.

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Edgedancer (The Stormlight Archive #2.5) by Brandon Sanderson: Book Review

Three years ago, Lift asked a goddess to stop her from growing older–a wish she believed was granted. Now, in Edgedancer, the barely teenage nascent Knight Radiant finds that time stands still for no one. Although the young Azish emperor granted her safe haven from an executioner she knows only as Darkness, court life is suffocating

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